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George Armfield Artist Paintings Dog Portrait Artist

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Sorry, this is sold out , but contact us for similar alternative we may have.
kevin@cvtreasures.com

George Armfield (1808 - 1893)
"Dogs in the Marsh, 1850"

SOLD OUT.  But let us know if you have George Armfield paintings to sell.

Stunningly Beautiful 19th c. oil on canvas, British sporting scene titled "Dogs in Marsh". Signed l.l. "G. Armfield, 1850", depicting four spaniels flushing ducks,

George Armfield is a highly listed artist. You can find over 450 listings on Artprice.com. Furthermore, his value index continues to go up, particularly for his larger paintings. Over the past few years only smaller pieces such as 7x9" have been available at auction, often selling for over $5000. As you will note in the biography below, his best years were from 1840-1869, after which he suffered from severely poor eye sight and was only able to paint small pieces thereafter. This is most likely the reason why his larger works command high demand and value. This is one of his larger, and BEST paintings to surface on the market in several years.

Condition is very good with some touch up in a few areas, primarily the upper right sky area, less then 5% touch up throughout. Some craquelures due to age. Other then that an extraordinary piece by an extraordinary artist. Possibly his best work, during his prime!

Has J.J. Gillespie Art Gallery label on back. If you Google you will find, "JJ Gillespie - America's Oldest Fine Art Gallery - Established 1832".


Size: 18 1/2" x 27 1/2" without frame, 24x33" framed.

Bio:
George Armfield Smith (for by this name he was known until the year 1840) was born in Wales. (Actually Bristol: according to Armfield family information) His father was a painter, who for some time had a studio at 54, Pall Mall, London, (His father was the portrait painter William Armfield Hobday (1771-1831)) and from his father, George Armfield obtained any artistic tuition he may have received.

He first exhibited in the year 1839, at the British Institution, when he showed two pictures, the "Study of a Dog's Head" and "Terrier chasing a Rabbit." These works must have attracted notice, for in the Sporting Magazine of the following year, 1840, we find the first of a long series of his pictures which were engraved for that publication. In 1840 he exhibited for the first time at the Royal Academy, showing two pictures, "Fox and Wild Rabbits" and "Terrier and Rabbit," and, as the lists show, he continued to exhibit with regularity at both the Academy and the British Institution for the ensuing twenty years. He also sent pictures frequently to the Suffolk Street exhibitions.

The British Institution catalogue gives his address in 1839 as 15, Lamb's Conduit Passage; but if he resided there at this time, he could not have remained long, as he spent practically all his life at Camberwell, Clapham, and Brixton. His best period extended from 1840 to about 1869, and during these years his output was large. About 1870 his sight began to fail, and in 1872 he submitted to an operation on one of his eyes at Guy's Hospital, when Dr. Bader removed the lens. The operation was only partially successful, and his powers rapidly declined, he became the victim of fits of acute depression, in one of which he attempted to take his own life. He recovered from the self-inflicted wound, and continued to paint, but was able to work only with the aid of a powerful glass and on small canvase
s.