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Product 314/573

John Wayne, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, vintage photo still 1949

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kevin@cvtreasures.com

John Wayne - "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon", 1949
Original Vintage Silver Gelatin Photographic still


This ORIGINAL, silver gelatin photographic still was printed to promote the first theatrical release of the 1949 classic American, western feature, SHE WORE A YELLOW RIBBON.  It is an incredibly detailed, high quality, high contrast image of John Wayne and his co-stars Ben Johnson and real WWI Vet Rudy Bowman.   Size 7.5 x 9" (original size not trimmed)

The lot also includes the RKO Feature Service folder (which I have Never seen for sale in 30 years of collecting), that contained the still, and two descriptive sheets pertaining to the still and other publicity material distributed for the film

The film stars John Wayne, as Captain Nathan Brittles, with Joanne Dru, John Agar, Ben Johnson, Harry Carey, Jr., Victor McLaglen, Mildred Natwick, George O'Brien, Arthur Shields, Michael Dugan, Tom Tyler, Noble Johnson, and the subject of the listed still, Rudy Bowman.   It was directed by the legendary John Ford.

Be sure to read the detailed descriptive sheet that discusess the life and career of RUDY BOWMAN, the fallen calvary man in the still, who was struck mute during service in the First World War, but persevered in his desire to be an actor!

The single weight, glossy, silver gelatin photographic still is an ORIGINAL still, printed from the original negative, at the time the film was first released (1940).  It is NOT a reprint, restrike, reproduction, re-issue, or commercial item available to the general public. It was created to be displayed in the movie theatre lobby to publicize the film.

This still is from the W. Ward Marsh archives.

Provenance of the Movie Stills

W. Ward Marsh (1893-1971) was the film critic for the Cleveland Plain Dealer newspaper from 1919 until his retirement in 1970.  In 1919 Marsh wrote his first of 23,000 movie reviews for the Plain Dealer. As the area's movie trivia authority, Marsh wrote and produced a local television movie quiz program in the 1950's called "Lights, Camera, Question."  He also taught "The History, Enjoyment, and Criticism of the Movie" course at Western Reserve's Cleveland College.  In the 1960's, Marsh fought a losing battle against the screen's increasing sexual permissiveness.  His scathing review of a film titled THE LOVERS in 1959, contributed to the prosecution of its exhibitor, Nico Jacobellis of the Heights Art Theatre, for obscenity.  In a landmark censorship ruling in 1964, the U.S. Supreme Court declared the film was not obscene.  Marsh died less than a year after his retirement in 1970.  His library, and photographic and memorabilia archives were given to the proprietor of Cleveland's finest bookstore and later acquired by a long time collector