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Product 353/470

Plan 9 from Outer Space Lobby Card Ed Woods Bela Lugosi 2

$650.00

Original  Vintage Classic Horror Sci Fi Old Movie Posters Film Memorabilia Collectibles For Sale
Plan 9 from Outer Space, 1958
Original Vintage Lobby Card Horror SCi Fi MOvie Poster 
Starring Bela Lugosi, Tor Johnson
Director: Ed Wood Jr

Tor Johnson Attacking Victim


 

A FIRST for CVTreasures !

Original Rare Vintage lobby card for the campy Ed Woods classic "Plan 9 from Outer Space", probably best known for being Bela Lugosi's last film  (although he died before production started).   A terrific lobby card featuring Tor Johnson.    Very good condition.  A terrific addition to any collection and/or memorable home decor !

* See enlargeable image above

Note: We recently acquired Two lobby cards from "Plan 9..."

Overall Condition:
very good. There is small paper loss in the top right blank corner (only blank white paper is affected. Otherwise, the card is in nice condition. Note that this lobby card is completely unrestored!

 

Plan 9 from Outer Space (DCA, 1958).  Lobby Card (11" X 14"). Science Fiction.
Starring Bela Lugosi, Mona McKinnon, Tor Johnson, Gregory Walcott, Maila "Vampira" Nurmi, Carl Anthony, and Criswell. Directed by Edward D. Wood Jr..   A restored lobby card with good color and overall very presentable appearances. It may have slight edge wear, corner bends..

They don't make 'em like this anymore, but then again, "they" never made 'em like this -- only the hand of Ed Wood could concoct something so insanely straight-faced and sublimely silly. This anti-classic featured Bela Lugosi's last performance, and more hokey dialogue than you can shake a stick at. 

It also posthumously bills Bela Lugosi as a guest-star (silent footage of the actor had actually been shot by Wood for another, unfinished film just prior to Lugosi's death in August 1956)

One of the classic films from legendary "bad" director Edward D. Wood Jr., this sci-fi epic is a testament to the ability of sheer willpower to triumph in the face of an utter lack of talent. Wood desperately wanted to make movies and tell stories; unfortunately, he didn't have the budget, ability, or connections to make that happen. Nevertheless, he managed to put together an impressive filmography of pictures that are still being enjoyed to this day, while many of his more "talented" contemporaries have faded into true obscurity. Say what you will about Wood, his pictures are always entertaining, even if it's not in the way he intended.

One of the classic films from legendary "bad" director Edward D. Wood Jr., this sci-fi epic is a testament to the ability of sheer willpower to triumph in the face of an utter lack of talent. Wood desperately wanted to make movies and tell stories; unfortunately, he didn't have the budget, ability, or connections to make that happen. Nevertheless, he managed to put together an impressive filmography of pictures that are still being enjoyed to this day, while many of his more "talented" contemporaries have faded into true obscurity. Say what you will about Wood, his pictures are always entertaining, even if it's not in the way he intended. Offered here is perhaps the pinnacle of Ed Wood collectibles, a glorious lobby card for his best-known, and most fondly-remembered, production starring Bela Lugosi, Vampira, Tor Johnson, Lyle Talbot, and Dudley Manlo

"It's so bad it's good" is a phrase commonly used to describe Ed Wood's cult classic science fiction opus. In fact, it's considered the worst movie ever made and that status has made it a genuine classic. Plan 9 also has the distinction of being the last movie Bela Lugosi ever made. Original material on this film is highly collectible
 

Bela Lugosi's last film

Bela Lugosi, in silent footage for the abandoned The Vampire's Tomb, which was later recycled for Plan 9 from Outer Space.
Shortly before Lugosi's death in August 1956, he had been working with Wood on numerous half-realized projects, variously titled The Vampire's 
Tomb or The Ghoul Goes West. Scenes unconnected to Plan 9, featuring Lugosi weeping at a funeral, walking in front of Tor Johnson's house at
 daytime, walking in and out of the Johnson home's side door at nighttime and a daylight scene on a patch of highway showing Lugosi stalking 
towards the camera and dramatically spreading his Dracula cape before furling it around himself and walking back the way he came, had been shot.
 According to the documentary Flying Saucers : The 'Plan 9' Companion, these shots were improvised. Only the first two sequences had reached any  level of completion. When Lugosi died, Wood shelved these projects.

Shortly after Lugosi's death the story and screenplay for Grave Robbers from Outer Space were written and finalized, with Wood planning to use 
the unconnected, unrelated footage of Lugosi as a means of putting a credit for him on the picture. Wood used the Lugosi footage as a means of 
attracting actors to the picture, gaining the interest of Gregory Walcott and Maila Nurmi, among others, by telling them he was making 
"Bela Lugosi's last movie." Though Wood's actions were driven in part by the desire to give his film a "star name" and attract horror fans, 
he meant the Lugosi cameo as a loving farewell and tribute to the actor, who had become a close friend. Wood hired his wife's chiropractor 
Tom Mason as a stand-in for Lugosi, although Mason was taller than Lugosi and bore no resemblance to him, making him one of the earliest
 "fake Shemps". Narration from Criswell was also employed in an attempt to better link Lugosi's footage with the rest of Plan 9. 
The theatrical cut of the film utilized every last scrap of material Wood had of Lugosi, including minor sprocket discolorations, film trims
 that would in a normal film be discarded as unusable. Cuts of the film on VHS during the '80s and '90s, the vast majority of which were
 unauthorized bootleg dupes, varied drastically in quality and the amount of Lugosi material retained.

Coincidentally, further Lugosi footage Wood had shot at an unspecified pre-1956 date was to have been the basis of a second posthumous movie 
for the horror legend, Ghouls of the Moon, but the footage had been shot on volatile acetate stock and dissolved into toxic-smelling sludge by
 the time Wood's thoughts turned to the new venture in the summer of 1959. Ghouls of the Moon was abandoned entirely as a result. Mystery 
surrounds the content and nature of the lost material, described only as 'wild' by a friend of Wood's who had seen the raw footage shortly 
after it was shot..

Note: Cvtreasures stamp Not on original